Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is an island country in the Lesser Antilles chain, in the southern portion of the Windward Islands, which lie at the southern end of the eastern border of the Caribbean Sea where the latter meets the Atlantic Ocean.

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Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (i/seɪnt ˈvɪnsənt ænd ðə ɡrɛnəˈdiːnz/) is an island country in the Lesser Antilles chain, in the southern portion of the Windward Islands, which lie at the southern end of the eastern border of the Caribbean Sea where the latter meets the Atlantic Ocean.

Its 389 km2 (150 sq mi) territory consists of the main island of Saint Vincent and the northern two-thirds of the Grenadines, which are a chain of smaller islands stretching south from Saint Vincent Island to Grenada. The main island of Saint Vincent measures 18 km (11 mi) long, 11 km (6.8 mi) in width and 344 km2 (133 sq mi) in area. From the most northern to the most southern points, the Grenadine islands belonging to Saint Vincent span 60.4 km (37.5 mi) with a combined area of 45 km2 (17 sq mi). Most of the nation lies within the Hurricane Belt.

To the north of Saint Vincent lies Saint Lucia, to the east Barbados. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is a densely populated country (over 300 inhabitants/km2) with approximately 120,000 inhabitants.

Its capital is Kingstown, also its main port. The country has a French and British colonial history and is now part of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States, CARICOM, the Commonwealth of Nations, the Bolivarian Alliance for the Americas and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC).

History

The island now known as Saint Vincent was originally named Hairoun ("The Land of the Blessed") by the native Caribs. The Caribs aggressively prevented European settlement on Saint Vincent until 1719. Prior to this, formerly enslaved Africans, who had either been shipwrecked or who had escaped from Barbados, Saint Lucia and Grenada and sought refuge in mainland Saint Vincent, intermarried with the Caribs and became known as Garifuna or Black Caribs.

Beginning in 1719, French settlers from Martinique gained control of the island and began cultivating coffee, tobacco, indigo, cotton, and sugar on plantations. These plantations were worked by enslaved Africans. In 1763 by the Treaty of Paris, France ceded control of Saint Vincent to Britain, who began a program of colonial plantation development that was resisted by the Caribs. France captured the island in 1779, but the British then regained Saint Vincent for good under the Treaty of Versailles (1783). This treaty was an ancillary treaty to the Treaty of Paris (1783), through which Great Britain officially recognised the end of the American Revolutionary War.

Between 1783 and 1796, there was again conflict between the British and the Black Caribs, who were led by defiant Paramount Chief Joseph Chatoyer. In 1797 British General Sir Ralph Abercromby put an end to the open conflict by crushing an uprising which had been supported by the French radical, Victor Hugues. More than 5,000 Black Caribs were eventually deported to Roatán, an island off the coast of Honduras.

Slavery was abolished in Saint Vincent (as well as in the other British colonies) in 1834, and an apprenticeship period followed which ended in 1838. After its end, labour shortages on the plantations resulted, and this was initially addressed by the immigration of indentured servants. In the late 1840s many Portuguese immigrants arrived from Madeira and between 1861 and 1888 shiploads of East Indian labourers arrived. Conditions remained harsh for both former slaves and immigrant agricultural workers, as depressed world sugar prices kept the economy stagnant until the start of the 20th century.

From 1763 until its independence in 1979, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines passed through various stages of colonial status under the British. A representative assembly was authorised in 1776, Crown Colony government was installed in 1877, a legislative council was created in 1925, and universal adult suffrage was granted in 1951.

During the period of its control of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, the British made several unsuccessful attempts to affiliate the island with other Windward Islands. This would have simplified Britain's control over the region through a unified administration. In the 1960s, several regional islands under British control, including Saint Vincent, also made an independent attempt to unify. The unification was to be called the West Indies Federation and was driven by a desire to gain freedom from British rule. The attempt collapsed in 1962.

Saint Vincent was granted "associate statehood" status by Britain on October 27, 1969. This gave Saint Vincent complete control over its internal affairs but was short of full independence. On October 27, 1979, following a referendum under Milton Cato, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines became the last of the Windward Islands to gain independence. Independence came on the 10th anniversary of Saint Vincent's associate statehood status.

Natural disasters have featured in the country's history. In 1902, La Soufrière volcano erupted, killing 2,000 people. Much farmland was damaged, and the economy deteriorated. In April 1979, La Soufrière erupted again. Although no one was killed, thousands were evacuated, and again there was extensive agricultural damage. In 1980 and 1987, hurricanes compromised many banana and coconut plantations. Hurricane seasons were also very active in 1998 and 1999, with Hurricane Lenny in 1999 causing extensive damage to the west coast of the island.

On November 25, 2009, voters were asked to approve a new constitution in a referendum. The new constitution proposed to make the country a republic and replacing Queen Elizabeth II as head of state with a non-executive President. A two-thirds majority was required, but it was defeated by 29,019 votes (55.64 per cent) to 22,493 (43.13 per cent).[2]

Politics

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is a parliamentary democracy and constitutional monarchy with Queen Elizabeth II as head of state, bearing the title Queen of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The Queen does not reside in the islands and is represented in the country by the Governor General of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, currently Sir Frederick Ballantyne.

The office of Governor General has mostly ceremonial functions including the opening of the islands' House of Assembly and the appointment of various government officials. Control of the government rests with the elected Prime Minister and his or her cabinet. The current Prime Minister is Ralph Gonsalves. Parliamentary opposition made of the largest minority stakeholder in general elections, headed by the leader of the opposition. The current opposition leader is Arnhim Eustace.

The country has no formal armed forces, although the Royal Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Police Force includes a Special Service Unit as well as a militia that has a supporting role on the island.

Geography

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines lies to the west of Barbados south of Saint Lucia and north of Grenada in the Windward Islands of the Lesser Antilles, an island arc of the Caribbean Sea. The islands of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines include the main island of Saint Vincent (344 km2/133 sq mi) and the northern two-thirds of the Grenadines (45 km2/17 sq mi), which are a chain of small islands stretching south from Saint Vincent to Grenada.

The island of Saint Vincent is volcanic and includes little level ground. The windward side of the island is very rocky and steep, while the leeward side has more sandy beaches and bays.[citation needed] The country's highest peak is La Soufrière volcano at 1,234 m (4,049 ft).

Administrative divisions

Administratively, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is divided into six parishes. Five parishes are on Saint Vincent, while the sixth is made up of the Grenadine islands. Kingstown is located in the Parish of Saint George and is the capital city and central administrative centre of the country.

Charlotte Saint George Saint Andrew Saint Patrick Saint David Grenadines CARIBBEAN SEA

Economy



Mustique in the Grenadines.



Graphical depiction of St. Vincent and the Grenadines's product exports in 28 color coded categories.

Agriculture, dominated by banana production, is the most important sector of this lower-middle-income economy. The services sector, based mostly on a growing tourist industry, is also important. The government has been relatively unsuccessful at introducing new industries, and the unemployment rate remains high at 19.8% in the 1991 census[3] to 15% in 2001.[4] The continuing dependence on a single crop represents the biggest obstacle to the islands' development as tropical storms wiped out substantial portions of crops in many years.

The tourism sector has considerable potential for development. The recent filming of the Pirates of the Caribbean movies on the island has helped to expose the country to more potential visitors and investors. Recent growth has been stimulated by strong activity in the construction sector and an improvement in tourism.[5]

An international airport[6] is currently under construction. There is a small manufacturing sector and a small offshore financial sector whose particularly restrictive secrecy laws have caused some international concern.[citation needed] In addition, the natives of Bequia are permitted to hunt up to four Humpback Whales per year under IWC subsistence quotas.

Demographics

The population as established in July 2009 was 104,574. The ethnic composition was 66% African descent, 20% of mixed descent, 6% East Indian, 4% Caucasian (mainly Portuguese), 2% Carib Amerindian and 2% others according to the CIA World Factbook de dato October 9, 2008. Most Vincentians are the descendants of African people brought to the island to work on plantations. There are other ethnic groups such as Portuguese (from Madeira) and East Indians, both brought in to work on the plantations after the abolishing of slavery by the British, and Syrians[citation needed] living on the island. There is also a growing Chinese population.[citation needed]

Cultural

Sport

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines has its own Football league, the NLA Premier League, and also a national (association) football team. A notable Vincentian footballer is Ezra Hendrickson, former national team captain who played at several Major League Soccer clubs in the United States and is now an assistant coach with the Seattle Sounders FC.[7]

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines also has its own national rugby union team which is ranked 73rd in the world.

In addition, netball is a major local sport and comprises women only. Other notable sports played at the regional level are track and field and tennis.

Music

Music popular in Saint Vincent and the Grenadine includes big drum, calypso, soca, steelpan and reggae. String band music, quadrille and bele music and traditional storytelling are also popular.

The national anthem of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is "Saint Vincent Land so Beautiful", adopted upon independence in 1979.

Communications

In 2010, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines had 21,700 telephone land lines. Its land telephone system is fully automatic and covers the entire island and all of the inhabited Grenadine islands.[4] In 2002, there were 10,000 mobile phones.[8] By 2010, this number had increased to 131,800.[4] Mobile phone service is available in most areas of Saint Vincent as well as the Grenadines.

The country has only ten FM radio stations including; 89.1 Jem Radio, 89.7 NBC Radio, 95.7 and 105.7 Praise FM, 96.7 Nice Radio, 97.1 Hot 97, 98.3 Star FM, 99.9 We FM, 100.5 First FM, 103.7 Hitz FM, and 104.3 Cross Country Radio. It has one television broadcast station ZBG-TV (SVGTV)[9] and one cable television provider.

The country has Three ISPs, Digicel, Karib Cable and LIME, that provide cellular telephone and internet service.[10]

Further reading

  • Bobrow, Jill & Jinkins, Dana. 1985. St. Vincent and the Grenadines. 4th Edition Revised and Updated, Concepts Publishing Co., Waitsfield, Vermont, 1993.
  • Cosover, Mary Jo. 1989. "St. Vincent and the Grenadines." In Islands of the Commonwealth Caribbean: A Regional Study, edited by Sandra W. Meditz and Dennis M. Hanratty. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
  • CIA Factbook entry
  • Gonsalves, Ralph E. 1994. History and the Future: A Caribbean Perspective. Quik-Print, Kingstown, St. Vincent.
  • US Dept of State Profile
  • Williams, Eric. 1964. British Historians and the West Indies, Port-of-Spain.



More information

Airports6 (2012)
Coastline84 km
Coordinates13 15 N, 61 12 W
Domain Suffix.vc
Ethnic Groupblack 66%
Ethnic Groupmixed 19%
Ethnic GroupEast Indian 6%
Ethnic GroupEuropean 4%
Ethnic GroupCarib Amerindian 2%
Ethnic Groupother 3%
Female Life Expectancy76.36 years (2012 est.)
Female Median Age30.6 years (2012 est.)
Fertility Rate1.89 children born/woman (2012 est.)
GDP$1.264 billion (2011 est.)
GDP$1.263 billion (2010 est.)
GDP$1.288 billion (2009 est.)
GDP Growth0% (2011 est.)
GDP Growth-1.8% (2010 est.)
GDP Growth-2.3% (2009 est.)
Government typeparliamentary democracy and a Commonwealth realm
Highest PointLa Soufriere 1,234 m
Land Area389 sq km
LocationCaribbean, islands between the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean, north of Trinidad and Tobago
Lowest PointCaribbean Sea 0 m
Male Life Expectancy72.48 years
Male Median Age30.8 years
NationalitySaint Vincentian(s) or Vincentian(s)
Population Growth-0.313% (2012 est.)
Roadways829 km
Terrainvolcanic, mountainous
Total Area389 sq km (Saint Vincent 344 sq km)
Total Life Expectancy74.39 years
Total Median Age30.7 years
Water Area0 sq km

References

  1. "Saint Vincent and the Grenadines". International Monetary Fund. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2012/01/weodata/weorept.aspx?pr.x=46&pr.y=14&sy=2009&ey=2012&scsm=1&ssd=1&sort=country&ds=.&br=1&c=364&s=NGDPD%2CNGDPDPC%2CPPPGDP%2CPPPPC%2CLP&grp=0&a=. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  2. "Constitutional reform referendum defeated in St. Vincent & the Grenadines". Antillean. 26 November 2009. http://www.antillean.org/2009/11/26/constitutional-reform-referendum-defeated-in-st-vincent-the-grenadines/. Retrieved 2011-12-16.
  3. "Statement of St.Vincent & the Grenadines". United Nations. 9 September 1994. http://www.un.org/popin/icpd/conference/gov/940912160112.html. Retrieved 2011-12-16.
  4. "The World Fact Book". Central Intelligence Agency. 10 November 2011. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/vc.html. Retrieved 2011-12-16.
  5. Lystra Culzac-Wilson (October 2003). "Report to the Regional Consultation on SIDS Specific Issues". United Nations Environment Program. http://www.pnuma.org/sids_ing/documents/National%20Reports/St.%20Vincent%20National%20Report.pdf. Retrieved 2011-12-16.
  6. "Argyle International Airport, St Vincent & the Grenadines". http://www.caribbeanconstruction.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=373&Itemid=2.
  7. "Ezra Hendrickson, Assistant Coach". Seattle Sounders FC. http://www.soundersfc.com/Team/Coaches/Ezra-Hendrickson.aspx. Retrieved 2011-12-16.
  8. "Saint Vincent and the Grenadines". About.com. 1 November 2005. http://geography.about.com/library/cia/blcstvincent.htm. Retrieved 2011-12-16.
  9. "SVGTV". St. Vincent and the Grenadines Broadcasting Corporation Ltd.. http://www.svgbc.com/svgtv.htm. Retrieved 2011-12-16.
  10. "About SVG: Essentials". SVG Tourism Authority. http://www.discoversvg.com/index.php/en/about-svg/essentials?start=5. Retrieved 2011-12-16.





Neighboring countries


Important people